Exhibit XXXIII

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1 March - 30 June 2011

Dedicated to Til's grandnephew Phillip Hunter Gervase, his wife Christie and their bouncing boy, Noah.

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Behind Bars VII

    This is the seventh of eight exhibits presenting the artwork, graffiti, and other expressions of incarceration at the former prison site in Lorton, Virginia. 
    This project began on 24 August 2002, when my wife Til and I attended a decommissioning ceremony, transferring jurisdiction of the prison property from the District of Columbia Department of Corrections back to Fairfax County, Virginia. At the time and subsequently, I had the opportunity to photograph the site during guided tours of the prison and, eventually, self-directed visits with the permission of the proper authorities at the time.
    This self-assigned project was undertaken in my spare time from 2002 to 2008, with the bulk of the work occurring from 2003 to 2005. My "canvas" consisted of  hundreds of cells and other rooms located in dozens of buildings on more than 2,300 rolling acres spread between the town of Lorton in Fairfax County and the village of Occoquan in neighboring Prince William County. 

Easter Island. Education Building (Y-07) Hallway, Youth Correctional Facility,, DCDC, Lorton, Virginia. 2003. Charles Albert Huckins

    The majority of buildings constituting the prison complex were assembled into four major groups, known as: 1) "Central" (or "Central/Max," including the primary maximum security area); 2) "Minimum Security;" 3) "Youth Correctional Facility" (or, simply, "YCF"); and 4) the "Occoquan Facility" (or, the "Workhouse"). Generally, these four facilities are represented in each of the eight exhibits which will be presented here, in approximate proportion to the amount of material I harvested in each of them.
    Over the course of this project, I managed to make a little more than one thousand images throughout the entire prison site, approximately one-quarter of which will be presented on this web site in one of eight separate exhibits under the banner of "Behind Bars." It is hoped that the viewer will find these images as compelling and as fascinating to ponder as I have in making them over the years.
    For other particulars relating to this project, the viewer is encouraged to review the introductory texts of the first three exhibits of this series (for which, see the "Previous Exhibits" section of this web site).

 Caution: Some images in this exhibit may not be considered suitable for viewing by children.

 

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